SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications submitted for public comment, or registered on the National Qualifications Framework, are public property. Thus, the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction: it is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

Bachelor of Applied Social Science 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
90844  Bachelor of Applied Social Science 
ORIGINATOR
The South African College of Applied Psychology 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
CHE - Council on Higher Education  HEQSF - Higher Education Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National First Degree  Field 07 - Human and Social Studies  General Social Science 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  360  Not Applicable  NQF Level 07  Regular-Provider-ELOAC 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2021-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2022-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:
The qualification is an undergraduate degree at NQF Level 7 in the Applied Social Sciences. The qualification aligns with the characteristics of learning outcomes at NQF Level 7 as specified in the level descriptors. The purpose of this qualification is to equip learners with knowledge, skills and attitudes (ethics) to better understand the social world, interpret and analyse relevant social research data, comprehend and develop a better understanding of self and others in a variety of social contexts and circumstances.

The qualification will provide learners with a solid foundation in, but not limited to, the following set of attributes:
  • The acquisition of a systematic and coherent body of knowledge within the applied social science field, combined with underlying principles and concepts of Applied Psychology that incorporates communication and problem solving skills as part of the pedagogic process.
  • The development of the academic skills and attributes necessary to undertake research, comprehend and evaluate new information, concepts and evidence from a range of sources within the applied social science field including psychology.
  • The development of the ability to review, consolidate, extend and apply the knowledge and techniques learnt in a professional context.
  • A foundation for self-directed and lifelong learning.
  • Interpersonal and teamwork skills appropriate to employment and/or further study.

    These attributes form the basis of a robust curriculum design in that they address:
    1. Core knowledge, skills and understanding within the field of study.
    2. Research skills.
    3. Critical thinking skills.
    4. Values, research and professional ethics.
    5. Communication Skills.
    6. Application of methodologies and practices within the Applied Social Science field of study as they pertain to counselling or coaching or management professions.

    This qualification is designed with the following outcomes in mind:
  • To develop the learner's academic skills to better understand the social world nationally and globally.
  • To develop the learner's ability to interpret and analyse relevant social research data.
  • To enable learners to comprehend and develop a better understanding of self and others.
  • To enable learners to apply their understanding of psychology as an applied social science in the specialised fields of counselling, coaching or management in a variety of personal and social contexts and circumstances within a diverse multicultural society such as South Africa.

    All aspects of the qualification reflect these outcomes in line with the configuration of modular offerings within each specialisation.
  • At NQF Level 5 all learners share core modular elements that include Research and Study Skills, Introduction to Psychology A and B, Interpersonal Communication Skills, Counselling Methods 1 and 2, Practical Counselling Skills 1, Development through the Lifespan and Diversity and Family in South Africa.
  • Given the different orientation of the respective streams of study, learners in the counselling stream begin to build a foundation in Mental Health Issues whilst those in the Coaching and Management Study streams explore Organisational Behaviour.
  • These modules are viewed as critical to the ultimate aim of developing a critical mindset that produces reflective practitioners, capable of thinking critically and analytically, capable of working effectively with people and who can begin to understand and practically apply a range of theories and modalities using a strong psychological framework within an Applied Social Science paradigm.
  • At NQF Level 6 learners continue with core modules that include Introduction to Contemporary Society, Community and Health Psychology, Conflict management and Self-Esteem and Motivation. Learners then continue with their studies within the framework of choice of specialisation.
  • Learners opting for the Coaching specialisation are required to undertake five specialisation modules at NQF Level 6, these being, Coaching Skills 1, Foundations in Positive Psychology, Applied Positive Psychology, Ethics in Professional Management Practice, and Developing Professional Practice.
  • Learners opting for the Counselling specialisation are required to undertake five specialisation modules at NQF Level 6, these being, Crisis and Trauma Counselling, Personality and Individual Differences, Learning and Memory, Practical Counselling Skills 2 and Ethics and the Professional Counsellor.
  • Learners opting for the Management Studies specialisation are required to undertake five specialisation modules at NQF Level 6, these being, Coaching Skills 1, Management Theory and Practice, Strategic Management and Planning, Ethics in Professional Management Practice and Developing Professional Practice.
  • These modules are intended to focus learners towards thinking critically and analytically and to apply their understanding of psychology as an applied social science in the specialised fields of counselling, coaching or management in a variety of personal and social contexts and circumstances within a diverse multicultural society such as South Africa.
  • At NQF Level 7, all learners continue with further core modules that include Social Psychology, Applied Social Research and Social Analysis.
  • Learners opting for the Coaching specialisation are required to undertake three further specialisation modules at NQF Level 7, these being, Coaching Skills 2 and 3, and Professional Practice. They also have an opportunity to select two electives in order to complete their studies.
  • Learners opting for the Counselling specialisation are required to undertake three further specialisation modules at NQF Level 7, these being, Practical Counselling Skills 3, Family and Relationship Counselling and Psychopathology. They also have an opportunity to select two electives in order to complete their studies.
  • Learners opting for the Management Studies specialisation are required to undertake three further specialisation modules at NQF Level 7, these being, Facilitation Skills 1 and 2, and Professional Practice. They also have an opportunity to select two electives in order to complete their studies.
  • These NQF Level 7 modules are viewed as critical to deepening a cycle of studies in the applied social sciences, yet at the same time, refining key aspects of their specialisation choice with a view to becoming well-rounded and effective practitioners who knowledgeable, skilled and ethical.
  • NQF Level 7 culminates in Fieldwork which enables learners to practical apply all of the knowledge and skills which they have acquired throughout the qualification in a supervised context that is relevant to their particular specialised field of applied social science (see criterion 1.10).

    Rationale:
    This qualification is to provide a foundation for learners with a broad career path in Applied Social Science vocations. The qualifying learner will have diverse career options in the Applied Social Sciences, incorporating employment fields such as human resource management, health sciences and psychological services.

    The qualification design is to provide focused teaching and learning with the emphasis upon how people and their diverse social statures interact within a specified social context. The qualification is grounded in the Social Sciences and is designed to help learners develop the academic skills to better understand the social world, interpret and analyse relevant social research data, comprehend and develop a better understanding of self, others and the application of the Social Sciences in a variety of social contexts and circumstances. The qualification has a psychological framework as part of a critical pedagogy of understanding self and others better within different social contexts by:
  • Providing the learner with a systematic and coherent body of knowledge based on the underlying theories of Psychology and Social Science.
  • Enabling the learner to interpret and reflect critically on key concepts and theories of psychology as an Applied Social Science in different social contexts as well as to comprehend and evaluate new information, concepts and evidence from a range of sources in the disciplines of Social Science and Psychology.
  • Providing the learner with the skills and abilities to develop professionally towards a career in the Applied Social Sciences.

    This depth of understanding and insight is pertinent to South African realities where diverse race and cultures co-exist within a context of different cultural, socio-economic and educational levels. This creates the potential for encouraging a greater acceptance of human difference in multiple work-related environments.

    The qualification aims to provide learners with an introduction to psychology and the broad field of social science. The social science focus has shaped the selection of core modules in order to assist students with a developed understanding of psychology and social science theory as well as the core skills necessary to work successfully with people in an informed and insightful way.

    At the same time, the qualification incorporates three specialisations i.e. counselling or coaching or management studies, each representing a specific Social Science application of the core knowledge and skills training of the qualification. As such, depending on their specialisation choice, learners undertake a range of modules dealing more specifically with counselling or coaching or management studies.

    These specialisation modules are viewed as essential to the ultimate aim of producing reflective practitioners who possess a well-rounded education and who are capable of thinking critically and analytically, working effectively with people, and who understand and can practically apply a range of Psychology and Social Science principles and theories within the context of their particular vocational specialisation.

    The qualifying learner will be well suited for employment in an extensive range of public and private sector enterprises and will be highly regarded for their ability to integrate theory with praxis and to be ethical and professional practitioners within their chosen fields.

    This qualification addresses the need for new higher education qualifications that are relevant to the workplace needs of South Africa.
    Learners are seeking qualifications that are accessible, academically engaging, and relevant in preparing learners who have the knowledge and skills necessary for employment opportunities and which have good articulation opportunities locally and internationally. In a developing society like South Africa, there is a high demand for counsellors (particularly in the field of primary health care), coaches who are skilled in positive personal psychology and corporate enrichment strategies, and effective managers who are robustly grounded with people management knowledge and skills. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    Learners are assumed to have the:
  • Knowledge of Mathematics or Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 4.
  • Capacity to do self study and complete written assignments.
  • Capacity in applying computer literacy in preparing reports, assignments and spreadsheets.
  • Ability to communicate effectively in English (read, write and speak).
  • Ability to manage their time.

    Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL):
    The Recognition of Prior Learning is the process that gives due recognition to the life-long learning of an individual gained through formal and/or informal training, work experience, general life experience, or through any combination of the above. RPL is applied where an applicant provides certified evidence that previous learning is equivalent to the learning outcomes of a module of study. A learner can gain access to the qualification through RPL.

    The process of RPL involves a fair and equitable assessment of the applicant's prior knowledge and skill in the field for which RPL is being sought. The institution may offer a successful applicant with a credit of up to 50% of the credit value of a qualification. The applicant will need to provide certified evidence of, or demonstrate his or her level of current competency in, the particular specialty for which credit or advanced standing is being sought. Evidence usually takes the form of a portfolio of documents which detail the equivalent study, work or life experience for which credit is being sought. As the majority of the institutions modules involve counselling and communication competencies, an applicant may be required to submit a videotaped role-play demonstration of his or her competencies and/or attend a special assessment interview with a qualified RPL assessor.

    Access to the Qualification:
    The access to this qualification is granted to applicants who meet the minimum entrance requirements or the alternative routes of entry. Applicants who are in possession of:
  • A National Senior Certificate (NSC) granting access to Degree studies English at NQF Level 4 with an achievement rating of 3.
  • Mathematics/Mathematics Literacy at NQF Level 4.
    Learners that do not meet the minimum admission requirements may be referred to write the Access Assessment Test before a decision is made on whether or not to admit the learner into the qualification. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    This qualification consists of compulsory and optional modules at NQF Levels 5, 6 and 7, to a total of 360 Credits. Learners are to choose elective modules as indicated. All required modules are to be achieved for learners to be awarded the qualification.

    Compulsory modules at NQF Level 5:
  • Research and Study Skills, 6 Credits.
  • Introduction to Psychology A, 12 Credits.
  • Interpersonal Communication Skills, 12 Credits.
  • Introduction to Psychology B, 12 Credits.
  • Practical Counselling Skills 1, 12 Credits.
  • Development through the Lifespan, 12 Credits.
  • Diversity and Family in South Africa, 12 Credits.

    Sub-total: 78 Credits.

    Optional modules at NQF Level 5 (choose one):
  • Mental Health Issues, 12 Credits.
  • Organisational Behaviour, 12 Credits.

    Total credits at NQF Level 5: 90.
  • Compulsory modules at NQF Level 6:
  • Counselling Methods 1, 10 Credits.
  • Counselling Methods 2, 10 Credits.
  • Introduction to Contemporary Society, 12 Credits.
  • Community and Health Psychology, 14 Credits.
  • Conflict Management, 14 Credits.
  • Self-esteem and Motivation, 14 Credits.

    Sub-total: 74 Credits.

    Optional modules at NQF Level 6 (choose one from each option):
    Option 1
  • Crisis and Trauma Counselling, 14 Credits.
  • Coaching Skills, 14 Credits.
    Option 2
  • Personality and Individual Differences, 14 Credits.
  • Management Theory and Practice, 14 Credits.
  • Foundations in Positive Psychology, 14 Credits.
    Option 3
  • Learning and Memory, 12 credits.
  • Strategic Management and Planning, 12 Credits.
  • Applied Positive Psychology, 12 Credits.
    Option 4
  • Practical Counselling Skills 2, 14 Credits.
  • Ethics in Professional Management Practice, 14 Credits.
    Option 5
  • Ethics and the Professional Counsellor, 14 Credits.
  • Developing Professional Practice, 14 Credits.

    Total credits at NQF Level 6: 142.

    Compulsory modules at NQF Level 7:
  • Social Psychology, 15 Credits.
  • Applied Social Research and Major Project Paper, 18 Credits.
  • Social Analysis, 15 Credits.
    Sub-Total: 48 Credits.

    Optional modules at NQF Level 7 (choose one from each option):
    Option 1
  • Practical Counselling Skills 3, 15 Credits.
  • Facilitation Skills 1, 15 Credits.
  • Coaching Skills 2, 15 Credits.
    Option 2
  • Family and Relationship Counselling, 15 Credits.
  • Facilitation Skills 2, 15 Credits.
  • Coaching Skills 3, 15 Credits.
    Option 3
  • Psychopathology, 15 Credits.
  • Professional Practice, 15 Credits.
    Option 4
  • Fieldwork: Counselling, 20 Credits.
  • Fieldwork: Management Science, 20 Credits.
  • Fieldwork: Coaching, 20 Credits.
    Option 5
  • Addiction Counselling, 15 Credits.
  • Counselling in Loss, 15 Credits.
  • Human Sexuality and HIV Counselling, 15 Credits.
  • Somatic Counselling Skills, 15 Credits.
  • Working with Adolescents, 15 Credits.
  • Working with Children, 15 Credit.

    Total credits at NQF Level 7: 128. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    Typically, a qualification leading to the award of a Bachelor of Applied Social Science Degree in the Humanities and Social Sciences aims to develop learners who will:
  • Demonstrate a systematic and well-rounded knowledge and understanding of important theories, scholarly positions and basic methodologies.
  • Act innovatively and pro-actively within a career.
  • Use own critical attitude and communication skills to participate and contribute to the economy and general society.
  • Interact effectively with others, operate in variable and unfamiliar contexts with responsibility, and become increasingly self-directed.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:
    Competencies addressed for each of the attributes are as follows:
  • The acquisition of a systematic and coherent body of knowledge, the underlying principles and concepts and the associated communication and problem solving skills.
  • The development of the academic skills and attributes necessary to undertake research, comprehend and evaluate new information, concepts and evidence from a range of sources.
  • The development of the ability to review, consolidate, extend and apply the knowledge and techniques learnt, including in a professional context.
  • The develop of a high view of ethical standards and treatments in the pursuit of dignity and respect within a professional context.
  • The understanding of the importance of good communication in terms of verbal and non-verbal skills.
  • The creating of a good foundation for self-directed and lifelong learning, Interpersonal and teamwork skills appropriate to employment and/or further study. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    The following Assessment Criteria may be applied to some or all of the Exit Level Outcomes:
  • The correct use of the terminology, concepts, principles and theories in written and/or oral communication is consistently demonstrated.
  • Analysis, evaluation and synthesis of recent and relevant research findings in the disciplines are provided.
  • Solutions to well-structured and practical problems based on theory-driven arguments are proposed.
  • The use of scholarly discourse and discipline-specific conventions are clearly and efficiently demonstrated.
  • Identified problems are reflected in well-defined and coherent representation.
  • Appropriate methods, techniques, tools and procedures relevant to the discipline are selected and applied.
  • Possible solutions based on theory-driven arguments are proposed, using the relevant modes of inquiry consistently.
  • Scholarly and critical reasoning skills are demonstrated.
  • Explicit recognition of the diversity, complexity and multi-dimensionality of a context and how that affects the particular work being undertaken is reflected.
  • The provision of relevant information pertaining to the strengths, weaknesses and opportunities of the context for addressing specific problems is demonstrated.
  • Relevant role players and resources that will contribute to resolution of specific problems are clearly identified.
  • Relevant factors pertaining to the context and people's performance(s) in these contexts and how they affect the particular work being undertaken are reflected.
  • Critical factors impacting on practical problems to be investigated from the perspective of the discipline are identified.
  • Topical issues from different perspectives are interpreted based on results from analyses of relevant national contexts and research findings.
  • Issues are clearly described and explained making effective use of comparing diverse theories.
  • Findings are evaluated, the boundaries and limitations of theory are defined and the provisional nature of research findings are tabulated.
  • Ethical and responsible solutions for practical problems are consistently produced.
  • Scholarly discourse and different modes of communication are effectively demonstrated.
  • Competence in higher-order cognitive domains and/or meta-cognition is reflected by interpretation, explanation and argument.
  • Knowledge and comprehension of discipline-specific conventions and scholarly discourse is demonstrated.
  • Current perspectives and scholarly debates pertaining to the discipline are compared and contrasted in different relevant contexts.
  • Critical appraisal of recent and relevant literature including both primary and secondary sources as reflected.
  • An extended essay/design of a minor research project aimed at engaging with a well-defined issue within a particular discipline is based on the findings from the analysis and evaluation of relevant literature.
  • Findings clearly state and contextualise an identified problem for research purposes.
  • The essential modes of inquiry relevant to the discipline/s in which the essay/project is developed are described.
  • All procedures (e.g., research strategies, data collecting) for undertaking the minor research project are clearly described in a coherent and appropriate fashion.
  • The appropriate research strategies (such as analysis, interpretation and evaluation) are clearly described in coherent fashion and appropriately for the writing of the essay.
  • Awareness of ethical accountability and cultural sensitivity pertaining to all related aspects, such as people, context, is reflected.

    Integrated Assessment:
    Assessment is the process of evaluating the quality and extent of learner achievement or performance in learning and as such determines the focus and approach of learners. Assessment has two principal purposes - a formative purpose and a summative purpose. The assessment tasks within a qualification may range from primarily formative to secondarily summative (integrative focus) but the overall balance of the assessment tasks must be to facilitate the learning process.

    The formative purpose of assessment is to encourage an in-depth approach to learning through learners' own activity and engagement with the subject. The summative purpose of assessment is to lead to the certification of achievement or ability of learners for external audiences. An important aspect of assessment is that it should develop in learners the ability to independently evaluate the quality of their work.

    The learner's competencies will therefore be assessed using an integrated method of both formative and summative assessment.

    Implied Competence and Range:

    Critical evidence for assessment purposes implies competence at the following:

    1.
  • The learner needs to know the basic principles of discipline-specific conventions at the relevant level of complexity (NQF Level 5) in order to provide evidence for this outcome.
  • Different cognitive domains can be used to critically compare, analyse, and evaluate theoretical knowledge.
  • The critical core of a number of disciplines included in the learning programme is determined by the scope of specific concepts, principles and theories included up to this level.

    2.
  • The learner should have ample competence at using the relevant discipline-specific conventions at this level of complexity (NQF Level 6).
  • Different cognitive domains should be incorporated in the training process to equip student to critically compare, analyse, and evaluate theoretical knowledge.
  • The critical core of one or more disciplines included in the learning programme is determined by the scope of specific concepts, principles and theories included up to this level.

    3.
  • Cognitive domains involve ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesise recent and relevant research findings.
  • Access to various kinds of information resources, such as the library, Internet and primary and secondary sources related to the core disciplines is needed.
  • Reading skills should be at the level required for making use of the different sources, such as hard copy and electronic literature.
  • Reasoning skills should include the ability to clearly substantiate arguments in reports on findings.

    4.
  • The qualifying learner should be able to explain the reasons for changes in knowledge and understanding in a discipline, and to recognise the significance of contested knowledge in a specific context.
  • Skills and competence should include, where apposite, the ability to perform empirical context-specific analyses in order to obtain the relevant information.
  • The qualifying learner should be able to interact with others in a learning group, understand variable and unfamiliar contexts, act with responsibility and initiative and become increasingly self-directed in addressing own learning needs.

    5. The qualifying learner:
  • Should know different techniques and strategies for communicating results such as electronic media, written and oral persuasion.
    . Should be able to recognise the significance of contested knowledge in a specific context.
  • Should show competence in an understanding of how, why and under what circumstances new information comes to be accepted as knowledge.
    6.
  • Reasoning skills should include the ability to express own opinions clearly and coherently, justify a position and present it logically, systematically using properly substantiated arguments.
  • Communication should show an awareness of audience, and capability in using different modes of communication (oral and written) and discipline-specific conventions and utilisation of different techniques and strategies for communicating results.
  • Access to various kinds of information resources, such as the library, Internet and primary and secondary sources related to the core disciplines is needed.
  • The qualifying learner should be able to demonstrate key scholarly skills through:
    > Logical thinking (including identification of flawed reasoning in a text).
    > Inductive and deductive thinking skills.
    > Thinking and reasoning (self-reflexivity is demonstrated at the appropriate Level).

    7. The qualifying learner should be able to use different procedures to generate scholarly information. These should include:
  • Applying standard procedures within the specific discipline, such as experimental or computational techniques, or deductive or inductive reasoning.
  • Collecting and recording appropriate data truthfully and in the appropriate format.
  • Analysing and interpreting materials.
  • Arguing persuasively about such analyses and interpretations.
  • Drawing valid conclusions.
  • Presenting these conclusions appropriately.
  • The qualifying learner should know the ethical implications of various kinds of research and be able to act accordingly. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    The Bachelor: Applied Social Science(B: AppSocSc) qualification is comparable with the following international qualifications in structure (flexible study options), duration (three year bachelor's Degree) and module content (not in its entirety).

    The University of York in the United Kingdom offers a Bachelor of Arts in Applied Social Science which is a broadly based, integrated and up-to-date qualification that provides learners with an understanding of social science and its real-world application. This qualification is a flexible Degree, allowing the learner to tailor interests by choosing a number of module options. As such, the Degree can touch upon a wide range of specialist areas, reflecting the inter-disciplinary influences on the subject. Training in social research methods, which are highly transferable skills to a wide range of contexts will be developed. The qualification comprises of the following compulsory modules:
  • Introducing Social Policy.
  • Introducing Social Psychology and Sociology.
  • Politics and Economics of Social Policy.
  • Ways of Knowing in Social Policy.
  • Social Research Methods.

    Examples of module options for Year 2:
  • Children, Young People and Social Policy.
  • Comparative Social Policy.
  • Environmental Policy.
  • Social Inequalities.
  • Social Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence.
  • The Policy Process.
  • Understanding Criminal Justice.
  • Victimisation and Social Harm.

    Examples of module options for Year 3:
  • Child Abuse and Social Policy.
  • Comparative and International Social Policy.
  • Demography, Society and Policy.
  • Disability: Policy and Practice.
  • Gender, Crime and Justice.
  • Health and Inequalities.
  • Housing Policy.
  • Illicit Drug Use.
  • Policing and Criminal Justice.
  • Social Security.
  • Sustainable Development and Social Inclusion.
  • The Well-Being of Children and Young People.
  • Understanding Families and Family Life.
  • Working in Organisations.
  • Youth Justice.
    The B: AppSocSc is comparable in duration and the flexible study options afforded to each learner but the theoretical component differs from that of the B: AppSocSc.

    The Australian College of Applied Psychology offers a Bachelor of Applied Social Science (Counselling). This qualification focuses on experiential learning, so the learner emerges job ready with skills that can be applied immediately and includes 400 hours of supervised work placement. The qualification comprises of the following 24 modules:
  • Interpersonal Skills.
  • Introduction to Psychology.
  • Conflict Management.
  • Counselling Skills 1.
  • Development Psychology.
  • Social Analysis.
  • Counselling Skills 2.
  • Counselling Methods 1.
  • Group work Theory and Practice.
  • Counselling Methods 2.
  • Social, Legal and Ethical Issues.
  • Counselling in Loss.
  • Cross Cultural Counselling.
  • Applied Social Research.
  • Practicum 1.
  • Social Policy.
  • Mental Health Issues.
  • Organisational Behaviour.
  • Elective 1.
  • Practicum 2.
  • Self-Esteem and Motivation.
  • Elective 2.
  • Managing in Ambiguity and Change.
  • Professional Development and Reflective Practice.
    The Australian College of Applied Psychology qualification is the closest comparison in terms of module content and like the B: AppSocSc it has supervised work placement.

    Conclusion
    The B: AppSocSc will provide the qualifying learner with a broad spectrum of new career possibilities because of the flexible study options available to each learner and additionally, has 200 hours of fieldwork in over 100 placement sites around South Africa. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This qualification provides learners with both horizontal and vertical articulation possibilities.

    Horizontal articulation at NQF Level 7 is possible with the following qualifications:
  • A Bachelor of Social Science.
  • A Bachelor of Arts: Psychology.
  • A Bachelor of Administration: Public Management.

    Vertical articulation at NQF Level 8 is possible with the following qualifications:
  • A Bachelor of Arts Honours Psychology.
  • A Bachelor of Administration Honours: Public Management.
  • A Bachelor of Social Science Honours. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
    Moderation processes and procedures ensure that all learners are assessed in a consistent, accurate and well-designed manner. Moderation verifies that assessments are fair, reliable, valid, practicable and transparent and also evaluates assessor performance. The moderation will be done internally and externally by academics in the field with qualifications at NQF Level 8 and/or above. 

    CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    The assessor must have:
  • A qualification in the related field which is at NQF Level 8 or above.
  • At least 5 years' lecturing experience in the field. 

  • NOTES 
    N/A 

    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. The South African College of Applied Psychology - Cape Town 
    2. The South African College of Applied Psychology - Johannesburg 



    All qualifications and part qualifications submitted for public comment, or registered on the National Qualifications Framework, are public property. Thus, the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction: it is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.