SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications submitted for public comment, or registered on the National Qualifications Framework, are public property. Thus, the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction: it is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION: 

Diploma in Food and Beverage Operations 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
91824  Diploma in Food and Beverage Operations 
ORIGINATOR
University of Johannesburg 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
CHE - Council on Higher Education  HEQSF - Higher Education Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
Diploma (Min 360)  Field 11 - Services  Hospitality, Tourism, Travel, Gaming and Leisure 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  376  Not Applicable  NQF Level 06  Regular-Provider-ELOAC 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Reregistered  SAQA 06120/18  2018-07-01  2021-06-30 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2022-06-30   2027-06-30  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification does not replace any other qualification and is not replaced by any other qualification. 

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:
School of Tourism and Hospitality has a clear mandate to train Food and Beverage Operators within a financially sustainable environment and their learner-staffed restaurants are managed in such a way as to cover their costs. Their focus is to provide excellence within the students' education and not to compromise quality.

On completion, the successful learner will demonstrate competence in using basic managerial skills within the Food and Beverage Operations.

The successful learner will demonstrate a sound foundation for the progression into managerial positions.

Rationale:
The remarkable growth of the South African tourism industry over the past years drove the industry towards being structured into tourism and hospitality sectors and sub-sectors. Differences between these sectors have become evident at the operational level. The demand for differential operational competencies must be sufficiently covered by appropriate, relevant and responsive undergraduate and postgraduate qualifications.

Industry has grown in complexity and competitiveness over the years. This change in life cycle is verified by international peer-reviewed conference papers and journal papers in the field of tourism and hospitality, showing diversification in scope and depth. A competitive qualification in the domain of Food and Beverage Operations needs the curriculum to speak to the demand perspective, notably, through direct input from leaders operating within the three major food and beverage sub sectors, namely contract catering, private catering and corporate.

The School of Tourism and Hospitality requires diversification to meet the needs and demands of industry and the learner target market. This qualification is in line with requests received and the diverse need to cater for individuals who have a special interest in the Food and Beverage sub-sector found within the Hospitality Sector. 

LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
Prospective learners must be able to express themselves clearly and correctly both verbally and in written English.

They must have fundamental numerical skills, including at least Mathematical Literacy at NQF Level 4.

Evidence of some exposure to the food and beverage industry would be considered as an advantage but is not essential. This could be in the form of the school subjects of hotel keeping or consumer studies or part- or full-time work experience in the industry proved in testimony from industry practitioners.

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL):
In terms of admission to the programme, prior learning is recognised as follows:
Learners who have extensive and appropriate work experience in a specific field in the hospitality sector may apply for Recognition of Prior Learning for relevant modules in Food and Beverage Operations. Credits towards, or a complete module, may be awarded to the learner using RPL.

Learners who do not meet the criteria for admission may be granted access to the qualification through RPL.

Access to the Qualification:
The qualification is open to any learner in possession of a:
  • National Senior Certificate (NSC) granting access to Diploma Studies.
    Or
  • A relevant Further Education and Training Certificate.
    Or
  • National Certificate (Vocational), at NQF Level 4 granting access to Diploma Studies. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    This qualification consists of 31 compulsory modules of which 11 are at NQF Level 5, 16 at NQF Level 6 and 4 at NQF Level 7, totalling 376 Credits.

    Modules at NQF Level 5 (120 Credits):
  • Business Literacy 1, 8 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Financials 1, 16 Credits.
  • Hospitality Health and Safety 1, 6 Credits.
  • Management Skills 1, 16 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Operations, 16 Credits.
  • Gastronomy 1 (Theory), 10 Credits.
  • Gastronomy 1 (Practical), 10 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Service 1 (Theory), 10 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Service 1 (Practical), 10 Credits.
  • First Aid, 2 Credits.
  • End-User Computing B Semester Modules, 16 Credits.

    Modules at NQF Level 6 (196 Credits):
  • Gastronomy 2 (Theory), 10 Credits.
  • Gastronomy 2 (Practical), 10 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Service 2 (Theory), 10 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Service 2 (Practical), 10 Credits.
  • Business Literacy 2, 12 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Financials 2, 12 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Laws and Regulations 1, 12 Credits.
  • Management Skills 2, 12 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Information Technology, 12 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Operations 2 (Theory), 12 Credits.
  • Beverage Studies, 8 Credits.
  • Gastronomy 3, 8 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Operations 3, 12 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Financials 3, 12 Credits.
  • Food and Beverage Laws and Regulations 2, 12 Credits.
  • Hospitality Operational Practice 2, 32 Credits.

    Modules at NQF Level 7 (60 Credits):
  • Global Tourism, 16 Credits.
  • Food Service Marketing, 16 Credits.
  • Service Leadership, 12 Credits.
  • Food Service Economics, 16 Credits. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Apply the principles of occupational health, safety and security in Food and Beverage enterprises in order to maintain a healthy and safe environment for both clients and staff.
    2. Employ good strategies to manage beverage operations.
    3. Use various modes of accessing and communicating information, including industry specific information technology in order to promote the Food and Beverage industry in a changing business environment.
    4. Apply financial principles to contribute to effective decision-making and sustainability of the Food and Beverage operation.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of the operation of the food production unit.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:
    This qualification allows all the Critical Cross-Field Outcomes to be addressed. 

    ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 1:
  • The term control point is defined and control points are identified in the food service system.
  • Critical control points in all areas of the food service system are identified.
  • Measures for protecting food at the various control points are described.
  • Food safety responsibilities of food servers are explained.
  • Common causes of food contamination, infections and toxicity are identified.
  • Steps to be followed by managers when handling a food-borne illness complaint are outlined.
  • Cleaning and maintenance of all areas in the food service system is applied to ensure good food hygiene.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 2:
  • Appropriate actions on the challenges that food and beverage operations may be faced with are identified and taken.
  • Basic beverage service is managed.
  • Principles of the control process are applied.
  • Food and beverage standards are understood and applied.
  • Menu planning skills are applied.
  • Effective stock control principles are applied.
  • Revenue control and controlling labour costs are managed.
  • Good practices of leadership, supervision, bar operations and bar marketing and sales are applied.
  • History and nature of beer, spirits and typologies of wines is explained.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 3:
  • Electronic communications are used to receive and send information for the purpose of advertising.
  • Social media are used a communication strategy.
  • An electronic process of receiving and storing stock and inventory controls is implemented.
  • The principles related to the provision of food and beverage are managed and maintained in such a manner that meets the expectations of the target market.
  • Eco-friendly practices and sustainability within the Food and Beverage Operation are applied and maintained.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 4:
  • Payments from guests/patrons is collected and handled according to institutional requirements.
  • Property management system for rooms and guest accommodation is controlled.
  • Property management system for food and beverage applications is managed.

    Associated Assessment Criteria for Exit Level Outcome 5:
  • Strategic service vision and service pledge for a hospitality organisation is developed.
  • Operations and management requirements of the restaurant industry are explained.
  • The dynamic nature of the hospitality industry and the various categories are discussed.
  • Ethics of the hospitality industry are defined.
  • The importance of tourists within the travel and tourism industry is explained.

    Integrated Assessment:
    A minimum of 6 assessments per year module are conducted. These assessments are of varying nature, depending on the module and the outcomes of the module. The assessments for theoretical modules will be in the form of assignments and written tests or examinations. Practical modules will be assessed through practical assessments, work plans and portfolios of evidence. The weighting of the different assessments toward the calculation of the final mark is clearly indicated in the study guide.

    Formative and summative assessment:
    Formative assessment opportunities are not formally recorded and take the form of class tests, question and answer sessions and monitoring of practical work.

    Summative assessment leads to the final judgmental mark in accordance to the institution's Assessment Policy. The assessments for theoretical modules will be in the form of assignments and written tests or examinations. Practical modules will be assessed through practical assessments, work plans and portfolios of evidence.

    Assessment of experiential learning:
    The semesters of Experiential Learning are controlled by a staff member from the School. The Lecturer has contact with the Industry Person on a regular basis to check on the learners' conduct and attitudes while at the placement. The same minimum criterion as per contact modules applies. Experiential learning, being a final year module, is externally moderated. The assessment will consist of monthly reports, employer evaluation and a final project.

    Feedback to learners on assessment tasks:
    Learners receive written and/or oral feedback on all assessments from the assessor. The date, time and place of feedback are communicated to learners as part of the assessment plan. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    The Open University Malaysia in Malaysia offers a Diploma in Food and Beverage Operations Management. The qualification is designed to equip learners with skills to operate and manage a food and beverage business. It develops from the basic principles of food and beverage knowledge and makes no assumptions about prior knowledge.

    Modules:
  • Principles of Food and Beverage Operations.
  • Food and Beverage Knowledge.
  • Food and Beverage Cost Control Management.
  • Basic Accounting for Food and Beverage Operations.
  • Principles of Food Marketing.
  • HRM in Food and Beverage Operations.
  • Workplace Communication.
  • Information Technology in the Food and Beverage Operations.
  • Project Paper.

    The Professional Development Institute of Tourism situated in the east coast of Vancouver Island, in the Province of British Columbia, Canada, also offers a Certificate in which learners specialise in Food and Beverage management.

    Modules:
  • Quality Sanitation Management.
  • Food and Beverage Service.
  • Food and Beverage Controls.
  • Bar and Beverage Management.
  • Hospitality Supervision.

    This Dilploma in Food and Beverage Operations comapres favourably with the qualifications from the countries mentioned above in terms of the modules and the content of the modules. All institutions focus on developing a learner who will be able to supervise, manage and/or plan for successful types of food and beverage operations in a hospitality outlet. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This qualification articulates with the following qualifications:

    Horizontally with qualifications at NQF level 6 in a similar focus area, such as:
  • Diploma in Food and Beverage Service.
  • National Diploma in Food and Beverage Management.
    Or
    Vertically with qualifications at NQF Level 7 such as the Bachelor of Technology in Food and Beverage Management. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
    Assessments conducted at exit points of the qualification are externally moderated by appropriately qualified people who have been appointed according to clear criteria and procedures and who conduct their responsibilities in terms of clear guidelines. External moderators are independent experts in their fields, with qualifications at least on the same level as the qualification being examined and are recommended by the Examining Academic Department for approval by the Faculty Board. External moderators are not appointed as part of a reciprocal arrangement and are changed after three years. 

    CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Any assessor must be a recognised expert in their discipline or sub-field with qualifications in the relevant discipline at a higher NQF level than that of the modules being assessed. The assessor should be currently teaching or have 3 years' experience of teaching in Higher Education and Training, or be recognised by academic peers as an authority in the particular discipline. 

    NOTES 
    N/A 

    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    1. University of Johannesburg 



    All qualifications and part qualifications submitted for public comment, or registered on the National Qualifications Framework, are public property. Thus, the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction: it is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.