SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED UNIT STANDARD THAT HAS PASSED THE END DATE: 

Coordinate the development of an information-based crime prevention strategy 
SAQA US ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE
243940  Coordinate the development of an information-based crime prevention strategy 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Victim Empowerment 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY
-  
FIELD SUBFIELD
Field 07 - Human and Social Studies People/Human-Centred Development 
ABET BAND UNIT STANDARD TYPE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
Undefined  Regular  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
REGISTRATION STATUS REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE SAQA DECISION NUMBER
Passed the End Date -
Status was "Registered" 
2007-06-14  2010-06-14  SAQA 0571/07 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2011-06-14   2014-06-14  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This unit standard does not replace any other unit standard and is not replaced by any other unit standard. 

PURPOSE OF THE UNIT STANDARD 
This Unit Standard is for learners and practitioners required by their work to address issues of crime and violence at local, regional, provincial and national level, and those who are interested in multi-sectoral approaches to crime prevention and safety. It is intended to equip such learners with familiarity to a range of crime and crime prevention theories that will enable critical analysis of crime prevention approaches and the ability to apply these to a particular environment. The Unit Standard will enable the learner to facilitate the effective coordination of strategic partnerships for the development of information-based crime prevention strategies.

Learners in this context include Integrated Development Planning (IDP) Managers, Managers, Non Governmental Organisation facilitators, inter-governmental forums members in various sectors whose core functions include crime prevention and safety issues.

Learners accredited with this Unit Standard will be capable of:
  • Examining crime and crime prevention strategies in the South African and international contexts.
  • Coordinating the establishment of strategic partnerships for crime prevention.
  • Examining crime and safety information.
  • Establishing monitoring and evaluation for crime prevention strategy.
  • Co-ordinating the implementation of crime prevention strategies. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    It is assumed that a learner will be competent in:
  • Communication at NQF level 5 or equivalent.
  • Project Management skills. 

  • UNIT STANDARD RANGE 
    N/A 

    Specific Outcomes and Assessment Criteria: 

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 1 
    Examine crime and crime prevention strategies within South African and international contexts. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    Crime theories are analysed in terms of understanding its applicability to the South African and international contexts. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Crime theories include the cycle of crime, violence and distrust, punitive and restorative approaches, criminal justice responses and crime prevention theories.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    The three spheres of the crime prevention model are assessed in terms of their potential effectiveness and relevance to the South African context. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Crime Prevention Model refers to the Cycle of Crime Violence and Distrust.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    The broader statutory and policy framework affecting crime prevention in South Africa is examined for the purpose of identifying key issues to be included in a local crime prevention strategy. 

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 2 
    Coordinate the establishment of strategic partnerships for crime prevention. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    Key roleplayers in crime prevention are identified to establish partnerships in respect of the development of crime prevention strategies. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Roleplayers include but are not limited to local government officials and politicians, police and, officials from the Correctional Services, Health and Social Welfare and Justice.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    Appropriate mechanisms are applied in order to formalise a crime prevention partnership. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Mechanisms include but not limited to Partnership Agreement, Constitution, Integrated Development Plan Guidelines.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    Different crime prevention strategies are evaluated and interpreted in terms of its effectiveness and appropriateness in various contexts. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Strategies include but not limited to Community Safety Forums (CSF), Local Crime Prevention partnerships, Safer Cities, Neighbourhood Watches.
     

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 3 
    Examine crime and safety information. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    The purpose and benefits of analysing a crime and safety information is discussed to support the development of a crime prevention strategy. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    A framework is designed to guide the crime and safety analysis. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    Crime and safety data are analysed to establish trends and implications of crime prevention strategies. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 4 
    Innovative knowledge and ideas from data examined are communicated to role-players for the purposes of the development of a crime prevention strategies. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Crime statistics may refer but not limited to criminal justice statistics, other data from SAPS, the courts, and Correctional Services, demographic information, infrastructure development plans, victim surveys, health and education data, audit of existing crime prevention interventions, crime prevention projects.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 5 
    Data gathered from sources of information are examined and summarised to provide insights in the development of crime prevention strategy. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 6 
    The role of qualitative and quantitative data in conducting a crime and safety audit and analysis is assessed in accordance with organisational requirements. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 7 
    The method to capture data related to crime and safety is appraised and illustrated according to scientific and local requirements. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 8 
    Recommendations are presented in a structured report to inform the development of a crime prevention strategy. 

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 4 
    Establish a monitoring and evaluation framework for a crime prevention strategy. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    Monitoring and evaluation principles and objectives are discussed and understood for implementation of a specific crime prevention strategy and process. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    Indicators to measure the performance of a crime prevention partnership and strategy are developed to achieve monitoring and evaluation objectives. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    Mechanisms and tools are established for effective monitoring and evaluation. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 4 
    The consequences of non-performance and non-compliance are explained with examples in accordance with current legislation and policy. 

    SPECIFIC OUTCOME 5 
    Coordinate the implementation of crime prevention strategies. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 1 
    Coordination mechanisms are analysed in order to pre-empt any management difficulties during the process of implementing crime prevention strategies. 
    ASSESSMENT CRITERION RANGE 
    Coordination mechanisms include but not limited to an understanding of and integration of all sectoral roles, effective time management, communication, facilitation, organising, conflict management and mediation skills.
     

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 2 
    The coordination of a multi-disciplinary crime prevention strategy is assessed in terms of potential challenges. 

    ASSESSMENT CRITERION 3 
    Strategies and mechanisms to integrate the crime prevention strategy are analysed and justified in terms of its benefits for specific contexts. 


    UNIT STANDARD ACCREDITATION AND MODERATION OPTIONS 
  • Any institution offering learning that will enable achievement of this Unit Standard and the related Exit Level Outcomes of the Qualification must be accredited by the relevant ETQA.
  • External Moderation of assessment will be overseen by the relevant ETQA at its discretion.
  • Moderators must have experience of developing and implementing crime prevention strategies at management level. Criminology, social science or a public management degree and at least 5 years experience of the Criminal Justice System (CJS) or crime prevention is required.
  • The accredited Training Provider will oversee internal moderation of assessment.
  • Internal and external moderation should encompass achievement of competence described in this Unit Standard as well as the integrated competence described in the Exit Level Outcome of the Qualification. 

  • UNIT STANDARD ESSENTIAL EMBEDDED KNOWLEDGE 
  • World Report on violence an health (WHO, 2002).
  • Guidance on Local Safety Audits: A Compendium of International Practice (National Crime Prevention Centre, Canada).
  • Crime, Violence and Injury (UNISA, 2006).
  • Crime Prevention Models (www.csir.co.za).
  • South African Constitution.
  • South African Local Government and Development, Social, Economic and Political policies.
  • National Crime Prevention Strategy (NCPS).
  • White Paper on Safety and Security.
  • Police Act.
  • Local Government White Paper.
  • Child Justice Bill.
  • Liquor Policy.
  • Intergovernmental Relations Framework Act 2005.
  • Municipal Systems Act (IDP policy).
  • Promotion of Access to Information Act 2, 2000.
  • Accelerated Shared Growth Initiative of South Africa (ASGISA). 

  • UNIT STANDARD DEVELOPMENTAL OUTCOME 
    N/A 

    UNIT STANDARD LINKAGES 
    N/A 


    Critical Cross-field Outcomes (CCFO): 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO IDENTIFYING 
    Identify and solve problems associated with crime prevention using responsible decision-making and creative thinking. 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO WORKING 
    Work effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organisation or community on a daily basis to effectively implement crime prevention strategies. 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO ORGANISING 
    Organise and manage oneself and one's activities responsibly and effectively to implement effective and efficient multi-sectoral crime prevention strategies. 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO COMMUNICATING 
    Communicate effectively using appropriate skills to develop and coordinate multi-sectoral crime prevention strategies. 

    UNIT STANDARD CCFO DEMONSTRATING 
    Demostrate an understanding of the world, as a set of related systems by recognising that problem solving in implementing multi-sectoral crime prevention strategies. 

    UNIT STANDARD ASSESSOR CRITERIA 
  • Assessors must be registered as assessors with a relevant ETQA or an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.
  • Assessors must have experience of developing and implementing crime prevention strategies at management level. Criminology or social science or public management degree and at least 5 years experience of the Criminal Justice System (CJS) or crime prevention is required. 

  • UNIT STANDARD NOTES 
    Supplementary Information:

    Contemporary crime prevention theory and practice provides a range of approaches, each one dealing with one or some of the elements that make up the complex problem of crime today.

    It is generally understood that crime is most often the result not of immediate or spontaneous impulse, but as a result of a combination of social and environmental events and circumstances over a long period of time. Thus offenders do not become offenders overnight; there are a number of contributing factors that result in offending behavior. Similarly, victims of crime do not necessarily reflect typically vulnerable profiles but may come from all sectors of society, including those traditionally regarded as well defended against victimization.

    The Three Spheres Convergence Crime Prevention Model developed by CSIR Crime Prevention Centre, articulates that crime occurs where there is a convergence of the will to offend, a victim vulnerable to the offence, and an environment that enables the offence:
  • Where there is the will to offend and an enabling environment, but no potential Victim, anti-social behavior results.
  • Where there is the will to offend and a vulnerable victim but no enabling environment, there is threatening behavior bullying and harassment-but crime itself cannot occur.
  • Where there is vulnerability and an enabling environment but no willing offender, fear and perceptions of unsafely proliferate, but once again, no actual crime happens.

    Thus, the model tells us that the three key elements of crime must not only each be present, but must also converge for a crime to occur. If crime is to be prevented, it therefore follows that intervention must occur specifically to transform the convergence by transforming the spheres that converge.

    By examining the population of each sphere i.e. the vulnerable victim, offender, or the environment, we can identify role players and potential pro-active and reactive interventions that will transform that sphere and consequently contribute to transforming the area of convergence/the prevention of crime.

    Key stakeholders in crime prevention include Local Government Officials and Politicians, Police, Justice, Corrections, Health, Social Welfare, Education, Sports, Arts, Culture, Economic Affairs, Labour, Home Affairs, Community Safety, NGOs, Business, Civil Society, Faith based organisations etc.

    Relevant sources of information and sets of data for conducting a crime and safety analysis include Criminal Justice statistics e.g. crime statistics and other data from SAPS, the courts, and Correctional services, demographic information, Infrastructure development plans, victim surveys, health and education data, audit of existing crime prevention interventions, projects etc.

    A framework for a crime prevention strategy should include a Vision, Objectives, partners and other stakeholders, roles & responsibilities, sources of information/Information base, scope of the project, time frames, budgets and budgeting mechanisms, reporting mechanisms, recommendations and tools for effective monitoring and evaluation etc.

    Criteria for assessment of the crime prevention partnership include issues with regard to sustainability, maintenance, role clarity, participation of stakeholders, and inclusively. The implications of ethics and accountability should also be explored and incorporated in the partnership agreement. 

  • QUALIFICATIONS UTILISING THIS UNIT STANDARD: 
      ID QUALIFICATION TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL STATUS END DATE PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QA FUNCTIONARY
    Elective  59258   National Certificate: Polygraphy  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  Reregistered  2023-06-30  SAS SETA 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS UNIT STANDARD: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.