SAQA All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.
SOUTH AFRICAN QUALIFICATIONS AUTHORITY 
REGISTERED QUALIFICATION THAT HAS PASSED THE END DATE: 

National Diploma: Defensive Mission Control 
SAQA QUAL ID QUALIFICATION TITLE
49853  National Diploma: Defensive Mission Control 
ORIGINATOR
SGB Air Defence 
PRIMARY OR DELEGATED QUALITY ASSURANCE FUNCTIONARY NQF SUB-FRAMEWORK
Was SAS SETA until Last Date for Achievement  OQSF - Occupational Qualifications Sub-framework 
QUALIFICATION TYPE FIELD SUBFIELD
National Diploma  Field 08 - Law, Military Science and Security  Sovereignty of the State 
ABET BAND MINIMUM CREDITS PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL QUAL CLASS
Undefined  240  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  Regular-Unit Stds Based 
REGISTRATION STATUS SAQA DECISION NUMBER REGISTRATION START DATE REGISTRATION END DATE
Passed the End Date -
Status was "Registered" 
SAQA 0762/05  2005-10-12  2008-09-17 
LAST DATE FOR ENROLMENT LAST DATE FOR ACHIEVEMENT
2009-09-17   2013-09-17  

In all of the tables in this document, both the pre-2009 NQF Level and the NQF Level is shown. In the text (purpose statements, qualification rules, etc), any references to NQF Levels are to the pre-2009 levels unless specifically stated otherwise.  

This qualification is replaced by: 
Qual ID Qualification Title Pre-2009 NQF Level NQF Level Min Credits Replacement Status
63309  National Certificate: Defensive Mission Control  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  151   

PURPOSE AND RATIONALE OF THE QUALIFICATION 
Purpose:

This qualification is aimed at persons who work or intend to work in the Command and Control environment as a Defensive Mission Controller or related occupational fields, and who seek recognition for essential skills in the conduct of defensive mission control.

The qualification will also be valuable for those who may have been practising within the discipline, but without formal recognition. This qualification is designed to be flexible and accessible so that recipients of this qualification know about and will be able to conduct the essential operations in South African Air Force Command and Control.

Recipients of this qualification are able to:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of aviation principles.
  • Perform mission control functions in a given scenario.
  • Plan military defensive air operations.

    Practitioners will generally carry out their role within the context of a South African Air Force environment.

    Rationale:

    Defensive mission control relates to providing in-flight command and control to aircrew in combat. This is a crucial element in securing the national air space and thereby maintaining the sovereignty of the Republic of South Africa. In order to meet the requirements of national security within the context of defensive mission control it is important to be able to identify and recognise the competencies required by the defensive mission controller and to identify how these relate to other military and aviation roles. There is a critical need to provide recognition to persons who are able to function as defensive mission controllers within the South African Air Force Command and Control System.

    The majority of the candidates for this qualification are likely to be working in the South African Air Force, with the knowledge gained in this qualification being directly applicable to the mission control fraternity of South Africa. Defensive Mission Controllers may also be used in civilian aviation, and job opportunities include operations officers, co-ordinators and flight dispatchers.

    This qualification will give learners the opportunity to build on the skills, knowledge, understanding and experience they already have to earn a formal qualification in defensive mission control. Candidates will learn to work in a high stress situation and to apply integrity, assertiveness, professional conduct and self-discipline to their daily lives in a competitive environment. Defensive Mission Controllers are also required to provide assistance in defending identified flash points in the area of responsibility that may lead to South African National Defence Force involvement. 

  • LEARNING ASSUMED TO BE IN PLACE AND RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING 
    The design of this qualification is based on the assumption that learners are already competent in terms of the following outcomes or areas of learning when starting to learn towards this qualification. Any Further Education and Training Certificate with the following three subjects:
  • Communication at NQF level 4.
  • Mathematics at NQF level 4.
  • Physical Science at NQF level 4.
  • Computer literacy at NQF level 3.
  • Provide radar reporting service NQF Level 4.
  • Perform a ground control and clearance service NQF Level 4.
  • Provide assistance to air traffic services NQF Level 4.
  • Operate communication navigation and surveillance equipment NQF Level 4.
  • Provide aerodrome flight information services NQF Level 4.
  • Interpret and communicate aeronautical information NQF Level 4.
  • Provide flight information services NQF Level 4.
  • Perform the duties of a command and control assistant NQF Level 4.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of aviation regulations and procedures NQF Level 4.
  • Demonstrate understanding of aviation law and procedures NQF Level 4.
  • Demonstrate understanding of Air Traffic Control NQF Level 4.

    Recognition of prior learning:

    This qualification can be achieved wholly or in part through recognition of prior learning in terms of the defined exit level outcomes and/or individual unit standards.

    Evidence can be presented in various ways, including international and/or previous local qualifications, products, reports, testimonials mentioning functions performed, work records, portfolios, videos of practice and performance records.

    All such evidence will be judged in accordance with the general principles of assessment described above and the requirements for integrated assessment.

    Access to the qualification:

    Candidates applying for this qualification need to communicate effectively. Lack of auditory skills will also limit access to the qualification in certain instances. Clear vision is also a requirement for achieving many of the outcomes of this qualification, and colour blindness or poor vision may hinder applicants from successfully completing this qualification. 

  • RECOGNISE PREVIOUS LEARNING? 

    QUALIFICATION RULES 
    Fundamental:
  • Candidates must achieve all 50 fundamental credits.

    Core:
  • Candidates must achieve all 113 core credits.

    Elective:
  • Candidates must achieve at least 77 credits of their choice from any of the elective credits. 

  • EXIT LEVEL OUTCOMES 
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of aviation principles.

    2. Perform mission control functions in a given scenario.

    3. Plan military defensive air operations.

    Critical Cross-Field Outcomes:

    This qualification addresses the following critical cross-field outcomes, as detailed in the unit standards:
  • Identifying and solving problems in which responses indicate that responsible decisions using critical and creative thinking have been made.
  • Working effectively with others as a member of a team, group, organisation or community.
  • Organising and managing oneself and one's activities responsibly and effectively.
  • Collecting, analysing, organising and critically evaluating information.
  • Communicating effectively using visual, mathematical and/or language skills in the modes of oral/written persuasion.
  • Demonstrating and understanding of the world as a set of related systems by recognising that problem-solving contexts do not exist in isolation. 

  • ASSOCIATED ASSESSMENT CRITERIA 
    1:
  • CAA regulations and standards are adhered to and applied in all aviation practices.
  • Flight details are calculated in terms of direction and flying time, taking into consideration the aircraft capabilities and the meteorological conditions.
  • The principles of flight are incorporated in flight planning.
  • Navigation is conducted in accordance with accepted aviation procedures.

    2:
  • Mission control functions are performed in accordance with the international laws of armed conflict.
  • Mission control is described in terms of aerial warfare concepts.
  • Aircraft are controlled in various missions.
    > Range: Controlled refers to positive control.
  • The position and direction of aircraft is constantly monitored during a mission.
  • Calculations are used to provide information to flight crew in order to complete the mission.

    3:
  • Military defensive air operations are planned in accordance with the international laws of armed conflict.
  • Aerial warfare principles are incorporated into air operations in terms of the planning of the defensive operation.
  • Air operations incorporate relevant military intelligence in terms of the planning of the defensive operation.

    Integrated assessment:

    The applied competence (practical, foundational and reflexive competencies) of this qualification will be achieved if a learner is able to undertake Mission Control at a tactical level of war in accordance with military doctrine, legal prescripts and procedures.

    The importance of integrated assessment is to confirm that the learner is able to demonstrate applied competence (practical, foundational and reflexive) and ensure that the purpose of this qualification is achieved.

    The achievement of applied competence of this qualification will be demonstrated if the learner is able to control defensive missions during joint, combined and multi-national operations through advice and support of higher authority and be able to communicate ideas, concepts and arguments verbally and in writing. To ensure this, all specific outcomes, embedded knowledge and critical cross-field outcomes of the unit standards of the qualification must be assessed as well as the exit level outcomes of the qualification.

    Integrated assessment processes could be advanced by the "clustering" of unit standards in order to assess them simultaneously and to avoid duplication of assessment of learning outcomes and fragmented assessments. Even though learners will retain credits for those unit standards successfully completed, the learner must, in order to successfully complete the qualification, demonstrate applied competence through an integrated summative assessment of the exit level outcomes of the qualification.

    During formative and summative assessments, a combination of a variety of assessment methods could be used to provide the learner with sufficient opportunity to demonstrate applied competence. Assessment methods could include amongst others observation (e.g. during simulation exercises), product evaluation (e.g. the research tasks) and questioning (oral and/or written). Exit level summative assessments of this qualification should include the assessment of knowledge, skills and values whilst greater weighting should be given to application in the workplace environment in order to integrate theory and practice. Simulated scenarios must be utilised (e.g. planning and execution of interceptions during defensive counter air operations) to enable the learner to demonstrate the ability to integrate the knowledge, concepts and ideas and put into practise the learning outcomes achieved across the unit standards.

    Learners must be assessed on individual work and as part of a team during formative and summative assessments.

    The above-mentioned assessment processes are also capable of being applied to recognition of prior learning. 

  • INTERNATIONAL COMPARABILITY 
    Germany:
  • Command and Control: Effective control and use of airspace directly influences the outcome of campaigns and battles. In Germany, provision for airspace control enables airspace users to operate with minimum mutual interference and without undue restraints. In any military organization worldwide, the use of warning and readiness states has become an imperial necessity. The SAAF as well as Germany has also adopted certain warning and readiness states.
  • Geometry of the Interception: Modern fighter aircraft intercepting intruders at supersonic speeds need assistance from mission control so as to gain maximum tactical surprise over the intruder. The way, in which German Mission Control approaches interception of aircraft, is very similar to that of the South African Air Force. Enemy aircraft is detected, a warning is issued and fighter aircraft is scrambled to counter the threat. The manner in which the fighter pilots are guided towards their target is also very similar.
  • Pattern control: In the execution of the combat profile, pattern control can increase the rate of success when intercepting a hostile, unidentified or enemy aircraft. All the factors that might have an influence in the execution of an interception should be taken into consideration. Both the German and SAAF consider that pattern control forms the basis of interceptions. Pattern control is utilized to keep mission controllers combat ready.
  • Air Defence Operations: Air Defence operations are designed to gain and maintain a favourable air situation to the degree that the enemy is prevented from interfering effectively with our own ground, air and naval operations. It is the first priority task of the SAAF as well as for the German Air Force to gain and maintain a favourable air situation whenever an enemy air force poses a threat.
  • The Management Environment: Analysing the external environment is a critical part of the management process. The approach of Germany is similar to the SAAF when making decisions. The situation in which one operates needs to be analysed before one can make a decision. Important factors are taken into consideration while operating in the current situation.
  • Electronic Warfare: German Mission Controllers needs to have an understanding of electronic warfare to be able to use it effectively as a decisive element of combat power. SAAF mission control also requires this knowledge to co-ordinate and integrates the use of electronic warfare in the tactical plan. The use of electronic warfare throughout the battlefield can support the synergy needed to locate, identify, damage and possibly destroy command and control structures and associated information systems. Training in electronic warfare provides mission controllers with a knowledge that will enable them to understand its integration into all aspects of modern warfare. SAAF electronic warfare training emphasizes the vocabulary of electronic warfare, radar and communications principles, electronic countermeasures and electronic protection measures, infrared theory and countermeasures, electronic reconnaissance as well as air defence systems.
  • Aircraft Instruments and own Equipment: The Mission Controller should know his/her own equipment and aircraft limitations and must have confidence in own abilities to handle his/her equipment under all conditions of flight. For the controller to be able to render assistance to pilots, he/she must be conversant with aircraft types, rules and regulations, tactics and equipment. The controller should also be fully aware and conversant with the pilot's difficulties when engaging enemy fighters.

    Australia:
  • Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC): LOAC is based upon the concept of humanity. This concept provides a direct relationship between humanitarian concerns and military objectives. This concept forbids any attack on an enemy that inflicts unnecessary suffering, injury or destruction. There must be valid military objective and the force used must not exceed the minimum required to achieve that objective. These principles are the foundation of all military training so those members understand the laws dealing with the application of military power in combat. The SAAF also adheres to the LOAC and training of this aspect form an integral part of every soldier.
  • Military Power and the Principles of War: The principles of war and military power form an integral part of training. These principles are the foundation to a sound decision making process. Mission controllers should understand military power and the application of principles of war, as this will enable him/her to make reasonable assumptions, projections and risk assessments of any battlefield spectrum.

    Canada:
  • Systems Studies: The core of this field of studies focus on radar, electro-optics, communications, display systems, navigation and guidance and weapons. These are brought into perspective by a study of the issues and techniques of systems engineering and integration.
  • Environmental Factors: In order for a mission controller to assist the pilot's survivability in battle (excluding aircraft performance and weapon systems), he/she must have knowledge of the effects the environment has within the battlefield. The workload of the pilot is extremely high. It is therefore expected from mission controllers to be aware especially if it is a single seat, non-radar-equipped aircraft. Clouds, haze, contrail levels and the sun are also contributing factors that can affect a pilot's survivability in battle.
  • Communications: Effective communication in aviation is extremely important. Methods or types of tactical communication include geographic broadcast control and tactical control. Communication (ground to air radio network system, ground to air radio communication coverage in the battlefield, voice links between command and control facilities as well as data links between command and control systems and subsystems), has physical limitations such as altitude, range and terrain. It is therefore very important for Mission Controllers to understand communications, as it is the most important tool for the command and control of any military activity.

    United Kingdom:
  • Scrambling: Once a potential air threat exists, the readiness of aircraft for air defence should be high otherwise the threat can materialize before the defender can react. Almost similar to the Royal Air Force, the SAAF has adopted procedures that predetermined aircraft be scrambled by means of audio and visual signals from predetermined positions for Air Defence.

    France:
  • Interception Techniques: The use of interception techniques contributes to the various types of interception course, the decisive parameters of an interception as well as the environmental conditions. Regulations for using fighters in interceptions, aircraft configurations, and the different categories of control, anti-collision regulations silent procedures, and supersonic flight regulations as well as the use of combat zones determine the application of the interception aircraft. Mission controllers need to have a extensive knowledge of interception technique to provide superior control for all airborne military missions.

    Currently the SANDF does not have formally nationally recognised or accredited programmes in Defensive Mission Control. The successful completion of the ND in Defensive Mission Control will equip South African Air Force Command and Control members with knowledge and skills comparable to other world-class military services as mentioned above. 

  • ARTICULATION OPTIONS 
    This qualification has been designed and structured so that qualifying learners can be recognised as a Defensive Mission Controller. This qualification acts as a springboard from which learners may progress to qualifications in offensive (learners are normally first trained in defensive mission control before embarking on offensive mission control) mission control, electronic warfare, air operations management and aviation.

    Learners can move horizontally or vertically between aviation related qualifications, although in most cases, some standards will be required horizontally before moving to another qualification vertically. This qualification has horizontal articulation with the following qualifications:
  • B Com or BA in Aviation Management (level 6).
  • National Certificate in Air Traffic Management (level 5).
  • National Diploma in Applied Military Intelligence (level 5).

    Possibilities for articulation outside of defensive mission control include qualifications that lead to the following roles:
  • Operational planning and management.
  • Flight dispatching.
  • Deployment commanding within the SAAF.
  • Aircraft accident investigation. 

  • MODERATION OPTIONS 
    An individual wishing to be assessed (including through RPL) against this Unit Standard may apply to an assessment agency, assessor or provider institution accredited by the relevant ETQA, or an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.

    Anyone assessing a learner against this Unit Standard must be registered as an assessor with the relevant ETQA or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA.

    Any institution offering learning that will enable achievement of this Unit Standard or assessing this Unit Standard must be accredited as a provider with the relevant ETQA or with an ETQA that has a Memorandum of Understanding with the relevant ETQA. 

    CRITERIA FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ASSESSORS 
    Assessors registered with the relevant ETQA must carry out the assessment of candidates for any of the unit standards that make up this qualification. However, the following criteria are specified for assessors who assess integration of this qualification:
  • Be competent in the outcomes of this qualification.
  • Have a minimum of 3 years experience in Defensive Mission Control. 

  • NOTES 
    This qualification has been replaced by qualification 63309, which is "National Certificate: Defensive Mission Control", Level 5, 161 credits. 

    UNIT STANDARDS: 
      ID UNIT STANDARD TITLE PRE-2009 NQF LEVEL NQF LEVEL CREDITS
    Core  120055  Conduct mission control for combat profiles  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Core  120049  Conduct mission control for practice patterns  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120056  Conduct mission control for recovery control profiles  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120050  Control missions outside controlled airspace  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120059  Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of operation and use of radio aids in air navigation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120044  Demonstrate knowledge of Airpower  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120057  Demonstrate knowledge of electronic emission theory  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  12 
    Core  120045  Demonstrate understanding of aircraft instrumentation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120054  Demonstrate understanding of the components of aerial warfare in mission control  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120040  Demonstrate understanding of the concepts of operational command and control  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120039  Determine the integrated influence of the operational environment on a flight operation in accordance with South African Air Force doctrine  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120043  Integrate the functions of the Air Picture Display System  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  20 
    Core  120048  Provide a Flight Authorisation Service  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120053  Scramble aircraft for air defence missions  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Core  120051  Conduct mission control for a combination of profiles  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Fundamental  15234  Apply efficient time management to the work of a department/division/section  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  15237  Build teams to meet set goals and objectives  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  10622  Conduct communication within a business environment  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  117985  Demonstrate an understanding of the Law of Armed Conflict during multi-national operations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  10 
    Fundamental  120047  Demonstrate understanding of human performance and limitations in aviation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  120041  Demonstrate understanding of the principles of flight  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  120058  Demonstrate understanding of the principles of navigating an aircraft  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Fundamental  120042  Interpret meteorology for aviation  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  13939  Apply technical knowledge and skill in order to manage risk in emergency planning  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  115468  Interpret a topographical map for navigational purposes  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  114589  Manage time productively  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  7997  Managing self-development  Level 4  NQF Level 04  12 
    Elective  115465  Use a hand held compass for navigational purposes  Level 4  NQF Level 04 
    Elective  7876  Conduct on-the-Job-Training  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  115753  Conduct outcomes-based assessment  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  15 
    Elective  15096  Demonstrate an understanding of stress in order to apply strategies to achieve optimal stress levels in personal and work situations  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  120150  Demonstrate the use of short-range communications specific to aircraft  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  120046  Demonstrate understanding of the military intelligence environment  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5  20 
    Elective  15233  Harness diversity and build on strengths of a diverse working environment  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  15225  Identify and interpret related legislation and its impact on the team, department or division and ensure compliance  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  15230  Monitor team members and measure effectiveness of performance  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  11994  Monitor, reflect and improve on own performance  Level 5  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L5 
    Elective  7859  Lead and manage teams of people  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Elective  120060  Manage HF, UHF and data communication specific to aeroplanes  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Elective  7881  Manage workplace diversity  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 
    Elective  7888  Monitor staff performance  Level 6  Level TBA: Pre-2009 was L6 


    LEARNING PROGRAMMES RECORDED AGAINST THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    When qualifications are replaced, some of their learning programmes are moved to being recorded against the replacement qualifications. If a learning programme appears to be missing from here, please check the replacement.
     
    NONE 


    PROVIDERS CURRENTLY ACCREDITED TO OFFER THIS QUALIFICATION: 
    This information shows the current accreditations (i.e. those not past their accreditation end dates), and is the most complete record available to SAQA as of today. Some Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionaries have a lag in their recording systems for provider accreditation, in turn leading to a lag in notifying SAQA of all the providers that they have accredited to offer qualifications and unit standards, as well as any extensions to accreditation end dates. The relevant Primary or Delegated Quality Assurance Functionary should be notified if a record appears to be missing from here.
     
    NONE 



    All qualifications and part qualifications registered on the National Qualifications Framework are public property. Thus the only payment that can be made for them is for service and reproduction. It is illegal to sell this material for profit. If the material is reproduced or quoted, the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) should be acknowledged as the source.